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Quentin Tarantino Films Ranked

August 19, 2019

To mark the release of Tarantino’s ninth film (or is it his tenth, as I see Kill Bill as two separate works), I’ve added QT to my list of directors’ rankings. Feel free to comment below if you agree/disagree…

10. Django Unchained (2012)

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As ever with Tarantino, there are flashes of inspired genre interplay and some seriously smart socio-historical politicking. The problem is the narrative. It is, at times, demonstrative, unwieldy, and contains some annoying little inconsistencies.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2014/10/18/django-unchained/

9. Death Proof (2007)

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Tarantino’s grindhouse homage isn’t especially ingenious or amusing. Though not a huge lover of car chases in films, Tarantino’s climactic one here does kind of save the film – not just because it’s thrilling, but due to the fact it’s the literal release valve and raison d’être of the film itself.

Full review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2019/08/20/death-proof/

8. Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)

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Tarantino tried to inject a gravitas and solemnity into his enjoyable kung fu pastiche of the first movie, and it seemed a reductive move. The strived for emotion and pathos of the climactic scene doesn’t really come together.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2019/08/13/kill-bill-vol-2/

7. Inglourious Basterds (2009)

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There’s some real wit and ingenuity here, but it was a sign of Tarantino going down the baggier and more demonstrative route dramatically. Am I the only one who doesn’t think the opening scene is quite as brilliant as the cultural zeitgeist would have you believe?

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2019/07/26/inglourious-basterds/

6. The Hateful Eight (2015)

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Tarantino’s always displayed elements of the dramatist, and never was that more on display (and tested!) than in his spare premise here. All the film’s successes and failures boil down to Tarantino’s relative skills and flaws as a writer inherently interested in structure and dialogue.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2017/01/01/the-hateful-eight/

5. Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (2019)

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Tremendously textured ode to the inspiration of old Hollywood that Tarantino adored. It’s baggy, has some scenes that don’t cohere and the violent ending is a rhetorical error, but it also features some of Tarantino’s best cinematography, and it’s arguably his most moving film too.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2019/08/21/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood/

4. Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)

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Tarantino’s last great film. A riotous homage to various genres (kung fu, manga, western, revenge, yakuza), while also being a cracking, colourful story, brilliantly told in its own right.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2019/08/13/kill-bill-vol-1/

3. Reservoir Dogs (1992)

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One of the great cinematic debuts, Tarantino took a well-worn genre and re-energised it with a newfound verve for the cadences of everyday dialogue, and the ingenuity of his scenario and directorial realisation.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/reservoir-dogs/

2. Jackie Brown (1998)

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Proof that Tarantino could have made a superlative genre director. The pulp fiction of Elmore Leonard proved a match made in heaven for Tarantino and his scabrous sensibility. In a body of wonderful performances for Tarantino, Samuel L. Jackson’s turn here as Ordell Robbie was his finest piece of work.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/jackie-brown/

1. Pulp Fiction (1994)

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An American masterpiece. Almost every part of its narrative and the dialogue that accompanies it is iconic. Tarantino’s möbius strip of a story is masterly too.

Full Review: https://pnabarro.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/pulp-fiction/

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